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Sponsorship

The Museumʼs Sponsorship Program is an excellent way for businesses to support the Museum and at the same time meet their business and marketing objectives.

Sponsorship comes in many forms and you can assist in a variety of ways:

  • Become a corporate sponsor of one of our events, exhibits, programs or special projects through a monetary contribution
  • Make a monetary donation to assist with the Museumʼs day-to-day operations
  • Provide volunteers for events or programs
  • Become a member of the Museum
  • Provide in-kind donations of goods and services

By sponsoring an event, exhibit or program, businesses benefit by:

  • reaching a large and captive audience
  • providing educational experiences that benefit people of all ages and encourage lifelong learning
  • providing a valuable source of educational outreach for schools and educators
  • supporting cultural activities enjoyed by families and the community
  • supporting their local museum
  • receiving recognition as a sponsor through logo visibility
  • receiving recognition in our promotional materials
  • being acknowledged in media coverage

If you are interested in learning more about how you and your business or organization can support the Museum through sponsorship opportunities, please contact us.

Do Not Miss

RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP or BECOME A MEMBER ONLINE!
Online application ...

Common Ground:
A Telling of Our Stories 2017
April 8, 2017
Tickets Now Available
$30 at Museum or Library
Details ...

** Please Note **
The Museum will be closed on April 8
as staff attend the Common Ground event
See you there!

In Our Temporary Exhibit Gallery

Let's Celebrate
CANADA
150 years!
Contribute to the Celebration Wall
more info ...

THREADWORKS: FLASHBACK
A Travelling Exhibit of Stitched Textile Art
March 14 - April 29
more info ...

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Kenora is the smallest town to ever win the Stanley Cup. A photograph of the winning team and a hockey stick used in the game are displayed to commemorate those players who, at the time, were described as that speedy bunch of scintillating puck chasers.