Events »

A Community Conversation

about the Kenora Bridge Art Pieces

Wednesday, March 20 | 7:00 pm

The Lake of the Woods Museum and the City of Kenora present:

 

A Community Conversation About the Bridge Art Pieces 

Wednesday, March 20, 2019
7 pm
Lake of the Woods Museum
300 Main Street South, Kenora

Let’s have an open, respectful conversation about the art pieces, their background, and moving forward. Everyone is welcome!

Please RSVP by March 13 to communications@kenora.ca or 467-2191.

The current bridge over the western outlet of the Winnipeg River is the third bridge spanning the waterway that connects Tunnel Island with the mainland to the west. The first was built upon a rollerway dam which had been built in 1887 to address lake levels. The floating bridge was constructed a year later. This bridge was eventually replaced around 1899 with a Parker truss bridge that allowed for single-lane traffic only. It was another 50 years before that bridge was replaced with the one that is there now.

On June 16, 1949 the bridge, which was under construction for 11 months, was opened for traffic. Four concrete pillars, two each on the east and the west approaches, formed a gateway onto the bridge. Each pillar was adorned with metal art depicting an Aboriginal hunter with bow and arrow or another spearing a fish from a canoe. When repair work was done on the bridge in 1997 the pillars and the accompanying artwork were removed and put into storage. They went missing for many years and were returned to the City in 2018.

Do Not Miss

CALL TO ARTISTS!
A Juried Exhibition at the new
Art Centre
Submission deadline June 1
Find out how to submit your work here

SUMMER SPEAKERS' SERIES
Historians Share Their Research on the
La Verendrye and Father Aulneau Story
June 25 and June 26 @ 7pm
Learn more about the 2 part presentation and the presenters

In Our Temporary Exhibit Gallery

COMING SOON!
34th Annual LOW Quilters Guild Show
May 28 - June 22 2019
More Info ...

sidebar_didyouknow_title

There were 6 prisoner-of-war camps on Lake of the Woods during World War II. The lumber camps housed German prisoners who were set to work out in the bush cutting timber. The Museum has several boat models built by the prisoners at those camps.