Get Involved »

Giving

The Big Picture Campaign

A new Art Centre for Kenora – that’s the vision.

A new art space deeply connected and rooted to the success of a well-established museum but free to strike out on its own remarkable path – that’s the dream.

A strong cultural presence in Kenora that inspires and supports artists, encourages creativity, strengthens community bonds, builds identity, invigorates growth – that’s the Big Picture.

Inspired by the generosity of longtime lake residents, Nicki and Bryce Douglas and their family, who will be donating their collection of Lake of the Woods works by noted Canadian artist Walter J. Phillips, the Lake of the Woods Museum’s Art Centre project is well under way.

  • To learn more about Kenora’s new Art Centre, please click here.
  • To view a video about the Art Centre project, please click here.
  • To view campaign progress to date, please click here.
  • To support the Art Centre with a pledge or donation, complete the following form.
Donor Information

Gift/Pledge Information
$
Donor Recognition
Select Payment Method

Plus an additional to cover gateway fees.

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.

Donation Total: $1.00

Do Not Miss

RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP or BECOME A MEMBER ONLINE!
Online application ...

We Are What We Eat
SPECIAL EDITION
Mennonite Food
Saturday, October 21 @ 2pm
SORRY SOLDOUT!!
For additional information about this event ....

HALLOWEEN Family Fun Day
Saturday, October 28 2-4pm
Learn more ...

The Battle of Vimy
Photo Presentation & Talk
by Braden Murray
Thursday Nov 9 7pm
About the event ...

In Our Temporary Exhibit Gallery

ON NOW!
ALONG THE ROAD TO FREEDOM
Women of Courage and Faith
September 19 - November 4
more info ...

TREATY RECOGNITION WEEK
November 6 - 10
addnl info ...

THE FACELESS DOLLS PROJECT
On Display November 21 - 25
Find out more about the Faceless Dolls Project ...

Let's Celebrate
CANADA
150+ years!
Contribute to the Celebration Wall
more info ...

sidebar_didyouknow_title

Matches were invented c1840 and were called 'vestas' after the Roman goddess of the hearth. Matches were often stored in elegant silver containers called vesta cases, like those on display in the Museum.